Coping Cat – Group

Mental Health Promising

Coping Cat – Group is a cognitive-behavioral approach designed to treat children ages 7–13 who are diagnosed with an anxiety disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, separation anxiety disorder) and their parents. Treatment is divided into two parts with nine group sessions each. During the first nine sessions, the therapist teaches children how to recognize anxious feelings and thoughts, use strategies to manage their anxiety, and reward themselves for facing the anxiety. During the last nine sessions, children complete tasks designed to expose them to anxiety provoking situations based on their specific anxieties. Exposure starts with tasks that are less anxiety provoking and increases gradually to tasks that are more and more anxiety provoking. Initial tasks are completed as a group before transitioning to individually completed tasks in later sessions. In between sessions, children complete exercises to aid in skill development. The therapist meets separately with parents twice during treatment.


Coping Cat – Group is rated as a promising practice because at least one study achieved a rating of moderate or high on study design and execution and demonstrated a favorable effect on a target outcome.


Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed: May 2022


Sources

The program or service description, target population, and program or service delivery and implementation information were informed by the following sources: the program or service manual, the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse, and the studies reviewed.


This information does not necessarily represent the views of the program or service developers. For more information on how this program or service was reviewed, visit the Review Process page or download the Handbook.

Target Population

Coping Cat – Group is designed to treat children ages 7–13 who are diagnosed with an anxiety disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, separation anxiety disorder) and their parents.

Dosage

Coping Cat – Group is delivered over 18 group sessions of three to five children. Larger groups can be accommodated if delivered with a co-therapist. Each session lasts about 90 minutes and sessions occur weekly. In addition to group sessions, the therapist meets with parents between sessions 4 and 5 and between sessions 9 and 10.

Location/Delivery Setting
Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings

Coping Cat – Group is delivered in clinical settings.

Location/Delivery Settings Observed in the Research

  • Mental Health Center, Treatment Center, Therapist Office

Education, Certifications and Training

Education requirements are determined by the organization implementing Coping Cat – Group. The program developer provides supervised training upon request.

Program or Service Documentation
Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

Flannery-Schroeder, E. C., & Kendall, P. C. (1996). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious children: Therapist manual for group treatment. Workbook Publishing.

Available languages

Coping Cat – Group materials are available in English.

Contact Information for Developers

Website: https://www.workbookpublishing.com/anxiety.html

Email: pkendall@temple.edu 

Results of Search and Review Number of Studies Identified and Reviewed for Coping Cat – Group
Identified in Search 7
Eligible for Review 3
Rated High 1
Rated Moderate 0
Rated Low 2
Reviewed Only for Risk of Harm 0
Outcome Effect Size Effect Size more info
and Implied Percentile Effect Implied Percentile Effect more info
N of Studies (Findings) N of Participants Summary of Findings
Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning 0.92
32
1 (5) 110 Favorable: 3
No Effect: 2
Unfavorable: 0

Note: For the effect sizes and implied percentile effects reported in the table, a positive number favors the intervention group and a negative number favors the comparison group.

Outcome Effect Size Effect Size more info
and Implied Percentile Effect Implied Percentile Effect more info
N of Studies (Findings) N of Participants Summary of Findings Months after treatment
when outcome measured
Months after treatment when outcome measured more info
Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning 0.92
32
1 (5) 110 Favorable: 3
No Effect: 2
Unfavorable: 0
-
Villabø, 2018
Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (Combined Child and Parent Report; % Loss of All Anxiety Diagnoses) 1.80 *
46
- 110 - 0
Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (Child Report) 0.26
10
- 110 - 0
Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (Parent Report) 0.06
2
- 110 - 0
Children's Global Assessment Scale 1.03 *
34
- 110 - 0
Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (Combined Child and Parent Report; % Loss of Primary Anxiety Diagnosis) 1.47 *
42
- 110 - 0

*p <.05

Note: For the effect sizes and implied percentile effects reported in the table, a positive number favors the intervention group and a negative number favors the comparison group. Effect sizes and implied percentile effects were calculated by the Prevention Services Clearinghouse as described in the Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Section 5.10.4 and may not align with effect sizes reported in individual publications.

Only publications with eligible contrasts that met design and execution standards are included in the individual study findings table.

Full citations for the studies shown in the table are available in the "Studies Reviewed" section.

Sometimes study results are reported in more than one document, or a single document reports results from multiple studies. Studies are identified below by their Prevention Services Clearinghouse study identification numbers.

Studies Rated High

Study 12152

Villabø, M. A., Narayanan, M., Compton, S. N., Kendall, P. C., & Neumer, S.-P. (2018). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth anxiety: An effectiveness evaluation in community practice. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 86(9), 751-764. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000326



Studies Rated Low

Study 12251

Wong, D. F., Kwok, S. Y., Low, Y. T., Man, K. W., & Ip, P. S. (2018). Evaluating effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy for Hong Kong adolescents with anxiety problems. Research on Social Work Practice, 28(5), 585-594. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1049731516658351

This study received a low rating because the standards for addressing missing data were not met.
Study 12358

Flannery-Schroeder, E. C., & Kendall, P. C. (2000). Group and individual cognitive-behavioral treatments for youth with anxiety disorders: A randomized clinical trial. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 24(3), 251-278. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1005500219286

Flannery-Schroeder, E., Choudhury, M. S., & Kendall, P. C. (2005). Group and individual cognitive-behavioral treatments for youth with anxiety disorders: 1-year follow-up. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 29(2), 253-259. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-005-3168-z

This study received a low rating because it did not meet design confound standards.


Studies Not Eligible for Review

Study 12143

van Starrenburg, M. L. A., Kuijpers, R. C. M. W., Kleinjan, M., Hutschemaekers, G. J. M., & Engels, R. C. M. E. (2017). Effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral therapy-based indicated prevention program for children with elevated anxiety levels: A randomized controlled trial. Prevention Science, 18(1), 31-39. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11121-016-0725-5

van Starrenburg, M. L. A., Kuijpers, R. C. W. M., Hutschemaekers, G. J. M., & Engels, R. C. M. E. (2013). Effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of a group-based cognitive behavioural therapy-based indicative prevention program for children with elevated anxiety levels. BMC Psychiatry, 13, Article 183. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-13-183

This study is ineligible for review because it is not a study of the program or service under review (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.6).

Study 12200

Afshari, A., Neshat-Doost, H. T., Maracy, M. R., Ahmady, M. K., & Amiri, S. (2014). The effective comparison between emotion-focused cognitive behavioral group therapy and cognitive behavioral group therapy in children with separation anxiety disorder. Journal of Research in Medical Sciences, 19(3), 221-227. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4061643

This study is ineligible for review because it is not a study of the program or service under review (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.6).

Study 12247

Lau, W.-y., Chan, C. K.-y., Li, J. C.-h., & Au, T. K.-f. (2010). Effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral treatment for childhood anxiety in community clinics. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48(11), 1067-1077. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2010.07.007

This study is ineligible for review because it is not a study of the program or service under review (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.6).

Study 14318

Southam-Gerow, M. A., Bonifay, W., McLeod, B. D., Cox, J. R., Violante, S., Kendall, P. C., & Weisz, J. R. (2020). Generalizability and decision studies of a treatment adherence instrument. Assessment, 27(2), 321-333. https://doi.org/10.1177/1073191118765365

This study is ineligible for review because it does not use an eligible study design (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.4).