Common Sense Parenting® – School Age

Mental Health Promising

Common Sense Parenting® (CSP) – School Age is a group-based parent training class designed for parents of children ages 6–16. The program aims to teach positive parenting techniques to strengthen the parent-child bond, and behavior management strategies to help increase positive child behaviors, decrease child problem behaviors, and model appropriate options to address child behaviors. 

 

Trainers deliver CSP – School Age in six structured sessions that teach parents about: (1) appropriate child discipline strategies, (2) effective praise, (3) social skills, (4) appropriate responses to and alternative options to address problem behavior, (5) strategies to manage strong emotions and remain calm, and (6) how to develop parenting styles that will improve parent-child relationships. In each session, trainers review the prior session, and instruct parents in new skills, model strategies, provide feedback on skill practice, and summarize the lesson. Between sessions, parents complete homework and practice activities.


CSP – School Age is rated as a promising practice because at least one study achieved a rating of moderate or high on study design and execution and demonstrated a favorable effect on a target outcome.


Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed: Apr 2023


Sources

The program or service description, target population, and program or service delivery and implementation information were informed by the following sources: the program or service manual, the program or service developer’s website, the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare, and the studies reviewed.


This information does not necessarily represent the views of the program or service developers. For more information on how this program or service was reviewed, visit the Review Process page or download the Handbook.

Target Population

CSP – School Age is designed for parents of children ages 6–16.

Dosage

Trainers deliver six weekly 2-hour CSP – School Age sessions in-person to groups of 8–10 parents. 

Location/Delivery Setting
Recommended Locations/Delivery Settings

Trainers can deliver CSP – School Age in-person in school settings, community-based organizations, and hospitals.

Location/Delivery Settings Observed in the Research

  • Community Center (e.g., religious or recreational facility)

Education, Certifications and Training

Trainers must have at least an associate degree in Human Services or Behavioral Sciences or 2 years of direct service or training experience. 

Trainers must complete a 3-day training workshop, either online or in-person. During workshops, trainers lead role play activities, discussions, feedback sessions, and video demonstrations. 

Program or Service Documentation
Book/Manual/Available documentation used for review

Burke, R., Herron, R., & Barnes, B. A. (2015). Common Sense Parenting®: Using your head as well as your heart to raise school-aged children: Trainer guide (4th ed.). Boys Town Press. 

Available languages

CSP – School Age materials are available in English, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Russian, and Spanish.

Other supporting materials

CSP – School Age Classes 

Burke, R., Herron, R., & Barnes, B. A. (2015). Common Sense Parenting®: Using your head as well as your heart to raise school-aged children (4th ed.). Boys Town Press.

Burke, R., Herron, R., & Barnes, B. A. (2015). Common Sense Parenting®: Using your head as well as your heart to raise school-aged children: Parent workbook (4th ed.). Boys Town Press. 

For More Information

Website: https://www.boystown.org/parenting/Pages/common-sense-parenting.aspx 

Phone: (800) 545-5771 

Email: training@boystown.org  


Note: The details on Dosage; Location; Education, Certifications, and Training; Other Supporting Materials; and For More Information sections above are provided to website users for informational purposes only. This information is not exhaustive and may be subject to change.

Results of Search and Review Number of Studies Identified and Reviewed for Common Sense Parenting® – School Age
Identified in Search 10
Eligible for Review 2
Rated High 0
Rated Moderate 1
Rated Low 1
Reviewed Only for Risk of Harm 0
Outcome Effect Size Effect Size more info
and Implied Percentile Effect Implied Percentile Effect more info
N of Studies (Findings) N of Participants Summary of Findings
Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning 0.20
7
1 (2) 66 Favorable: 0
No Effect: 2
Unfavorable: 0
Adult well-being: Family functioning 0.70
25
1 (1) 66 Favorable: 1
No Effect: 0
Unfavorable: 0

Note: For the effect sizes and implied percentile effects reported in the table, a positive number favors the intervention group and a negative number favors the comparison group.

Outcome Effect Size Effect Size more info
and Implied Percentile Effect Implied Percentile Effect more info
N of Studies (Findings) N of Participants Summary of Findings Months after treatment
when outcome measured
Months after treatment when outcome measured more info
Child well-being: Behavioral and emotional functioning 0.20
7
1 (2) 66 Favorable: 0
No Effect: 2
Unfavorable: 0
-
Study 14251 - Parent Training vs Waitlist Control (Thompson, 1996)
Child Behavior Checklist: Internalizing 0.11
4
- 66 - 0
Child Behavior Checklist: Externalizing 0.29
11
- 66 - 0
Adult well-being: Family functioning 0.70
25
1 (1) 66 Favorable: 1
No Effect: 0
Unfavorable: 0
-
Study 14251 - Parent Training vs Waitlist Control (Thompson, 1996)
Family Satisfaction Scale 0.70 *
25
- 66 - 0

*p <.05

Note: For the effect sizes and implied percentile effects reported in the table, a positive number favors the intervention group and a negative number favors the comparison group. Effect sizes and implied percentile effects were calculated by the Prevention Services Clearinghouse as described in the Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Section 5.10.4 and may not align with effect sizes reported in individual publications.

Only publications with eligible contrasts that met design and execution standards are included in the individual study findings table.

Full citations for the studies shown in the table are available in the "Studies Reviewed" section.

Sometimes study results are reported in more than one document, or a single document reports results from multiple studies. Studies are identified below by their Prevention Services Clearinghouse study identification numbers. To receive a rating of supported or well-supported, the favorable evidence for a program or service must have been obtained from research conducted in a usual care or practice setting.

Studies Rated Moderate

Study 14251

Thompson, R. W., Ruma, P. R., Schuchmann, L. E., & Burke, R. V. (1996). A cost-effectiveness evaluation of parent training. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 5(4), 415-429. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02233863


Studies Rated Low

Study 14247

Mason, W. A., Fleming, C. B., Ringle, J. L., Thompson, R. W., Haggerty, K. P., & Snyder, J. J. (2015). Reducing risks for problem behaviors during the high school transition: Proximal outcomes in the Common Sense Parenting trial. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24(9), 2568-2578. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-014-0059-5

Fleming, C. B., Mason, W. A., Haggerty, K. P., Thompson, R. W., Fernandez, K., Casey-Goldstein, M., & Oats, R. G. (2015). Predictors of participation in parenting workshops for improving adolescent behavioral and mental health: Results from the Common Sense Parenting trial. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 36(2), 105-118. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10935-015-0386-3

Mason, W. A., Fleming, C. B., Gross, T. J., Thompson, R. W., Parra, G. R., Haggerty, K. P., & Snyder, J. J. (2016a). Randomized trial of parent training to prevent adolescent problem behaviors during the high school transition. Journal of Family Psychology, 30(8), 944-954. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000204

Mason, W. A., January, S. A. A., Fleming, C. B., Thompson, R. W., Parra, G. R., Haggerty, K. P., & Snyder, J. J. (2016b). Parent training to reduce problem behaviors over the transition to high school: Tests of indirect effects through improved emotion regulation skills. Children and Youth Services Review, 61, 176-183. https://doi.org/0.1016/j.childyouth.2015.12.022

Fleming, C. B., Mason, W. A., Thompson, R. W., Haggerty, K. P., & Gross, T. J. (2016). Child and parent report of parenting as predictors of substance use and suspensions from school. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 36(5), 625-645. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272431615574886

This study received a low rating because baseline equivalence of the intervention and comparison groups was necessary and not demonstrated.


Studies Not Eligible for Review

Study 14249

Sternhagen, T., Schumacher, H., Ferrell, K., & Willman, A. (2020). Parenting children with ADHD. South Dakota Medicine, 73(7), 296-304. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32805778/

This study is ineligible for review because it does not use an eligible study design (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.4).

Study 14250

Thompson, R. W., Burke, R. V., Daly, D. L., & Ruma, P. (1992, August 14-18). Multiple effects of Boys Town's parent training program: Initial results [Paper presentation]. The 100th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, United States. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED352572.pdf 

This study is ineligible for review because it does not use an eligible publication source (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.2).

Study 14252

Thompson, R. W., Ruma, P. R., Brewster, A. L., Besetsney, L. K., & Burke, R. V. (1997). Evaluation of an Air Force child physical abuse prevention project using the reliable change index. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 6(4), 421-434. https://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1025093328618 

This study is ineligible for review because it is not a study of the program or service under review (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.6).

Study 14253

Thompson, R. W., Grow, C. R., Ruma, P. R., Daly, D. L., & Burke, R. V. (1993). Evaluation of a practical parenting program with middle- and low-income families. Family Relations, 42(1), 21-25. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/584916

This study is ineligible for review because it is not a study of the program or service under review (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.6).

Study 14254

Ruma, P. R., Burke, R. V., & Thompson, R. W. (1996). Group parent training: Is it effective for all ages? Behavior Therapy, 27(2), 159-169. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0005-7894(96)80012-8

Dishion, T. J., & Patterson, G. R. (1992). Age effects in parent training outcome. Behavior Therapy, 23(4), 719-729. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0005-7894(05)80231-X

This study is ineligible for review because it is not a study of the program or service under review (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.6).

Study 14308

Griffith, A. K. (2010). The use of a behavioral parent training program for parents of adolescents. The Journal of At-Risk Issues, 15(2), 1-8. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ942866 

This study is ineligible for review because it does not use an eligible study design (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.4).

Study 14310

Duppong-Hurley, K., Hoffman, S., Barnes, B., & Oats, R. (2016). Perspectives on engagement barriers and alternative delivery formats from non-completers of a community-run parenting program. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 25, 545-552. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-015-0253-0

This study is ineligible for review because it does not use an eligible study design (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.4).

Study 14313

Friman, P. C., Soper, S. H., Thompson, R. W., & Daly, D. L. (1993). Do children from community-based parent training programs have clinically significant behavior problems? Journal of Community Psychology, 21(1), 56-63. http://doi.org/10.1002/1520-6629(199301)21:1%3C56::AID-JCOP2290210107%3E3.0.CO;2-N

This study is ineligible for review because it is not a study of the program or service under review (Study Eligibility Criterion 4.1.6).